Diet influences microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa

A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has reported an association between diet quality and microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa. The researchers found that a high-quality diet is linked to more potentially beneficial bacteria; while a low-quality diet is associated with an increase in potentially harmful bacteria. They propose that modifying the microbiome through diet may be a part of a strategy to reduce the risk of chronic diseases.

An inflammatory diet correlates with colorectal cancer risk

Researchers from the Molecular Mechanisms and Experimental Therapy in Oncology programme (Oncobell) of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), together with the Biodonostia Health Research Institute (IIS Biodonostia), among others, have published the results of a multi-centre study that unveils a correlation between inflammatory and antioxidant diets and the risk of developing colorectal and breast cancer.

Early onset colorectal cancer increases not aligned with screening trends

Trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger adults, adding to evidence that the rise in early onset CRC is not solely a result of more detection. The study, ‘Are temporal trends in colonoscopy among young adults concordant with colorectal cancer incidence?’ was published in the Journal of Medical Screening.

Positive results from post-CE approval study of the C-Scan System

Check-Cap has announced positive final results from its recently completed post-CE approval study evaluating the clinical performance and safety of the C-Scan system, which according to the company, is the first and only preparation-free capsule based screening method for the prevention of colorectal cancer through the detection of precancerous polyps.

Targeted therapy combination improves survival in patients with advanced bowel cancer

New data have shown for the first time that a combination of targeted therapies can improve survival in patients with advanced bowel cancer. Results of the BEACON CRC Phase III trial have shown that triple therapy targeting BRAF mutations in progressive metastatic colorectal tumours significantly improved overall survival and objective response, compared to standard care.

More flexible dose of regorafenib to relieves side-effects in mCRC patients

Medical oncologists administer anticancer drug regorafenib to try to improve overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have ceased to respond to standard therapy (known as refractory mCRC). However, some of the adverse events related to the use of this drug often limits its use in clinical practice. A study reported at the ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer 2019 suggests the usefulness of a more flexible dosing, which improves patients' quality of life without jeopardising efficacy.

Researchers use AI for tumour classification and prognosis CRC patients

A research team from University Hospital Zurich and the University of Oxford have now developed a method to predict the molecular classification of colorectal cancer from digital pathology slides, which provides valuable information about the molecular subtype of the tumour when providing targeted therapy for colorectal carcinoma.

Researchers identify new way to make cancer self-destruct

For years, researchers have been trying to target a gene called MYC that is known to drive tumour growth in multiple cancer types when it is mutated or over-expressed, but hitting that target successfully has proven difficult. Now researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new pathway that works as a partner to MYC and may be its Achilles' Heel.