Diet influences microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa

A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has reported an association between diet quality and microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa. The researchers found that a high-quality diet is linked to more potentially beneficial bacteria; while a low-quality diet is associated with an increase in potentially harmful bacteria. They propose that modifying the microbiome through diet may be a part of a strategy to reduce the risk of chronic diseases.

An inflammatory diet correlates with colorectal cancer risk

Researchers from the Molecular Mechanisms and Experimental Therapy in Oncology programme (Oncobell) of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), together with the Biodonostia Health Research Institute (IIS Biodonostia), among others, have published the results of a multi-centre study that unveils a correlation between inflammatory and antioxidant diets and the risk of developing colorectal and breast cancer.

Early onset colorectal cancer increases not aligned with screening trends

Trends in colonoscopy rates did not fully align with the increase in colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger adults, adding to evidence that the rise in early onset CRC is not solely a result of more detection. The study, ‘Are temporal trends in colonoscopy among young adults concordant with colorectal cancer incidence?’ was published in the Journal of Medical Screening.

Positive results from post-CE approval study of the C-Scan System

Check-Cap has announced positive final results from its recently completed post-CE approval study evaluating the clinical performance and safety of the C-Scan system, which according to the company, is the first and only preparation-free capsule based screening method for the prevention of colorectal cancer through the detection of precancerous polyps.