Time to read
1 minute
Read so far

Pre-emptive analgesia may cut post-op pain in anorectal surgery

Wed, 09/05/2018 - 09:21
Posted in:
0 comments

Preemptive pain medication is safe and reduces pain in the early postoperative period for patients undergoing anorectal surgery (ARS), according to a study published in the journal of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum. The researchers found that patients in the active group had significantly less pain in the post-anaesthesia care unit and at eight hours postoperatively. Furthermore, significantly fewer participants in the active group used narcotics in the post-anaesthesia care unit and at eight hours postoperatively. A similar number of medication-related side effects was reported for the groups.

Dr Justin T Van Backer from Albany Medical Center in New York, and colleagues evaluated the effectiveness of pre-emptive analgesia in reducing postoperative pain among adult patients undergoing surgery for anal fissure, fistula or condyloma or haemorrhoids. Patients were randomised to receive preoperative oral acetaminophen and gabapentin followed by intravenous ketamine and dexamethasone before incision (30 participants) or oral placebos (31 participants).

The study featured in the paper, 'Preemptive Analgesia Decreases Pain Following Anorectal Surgery: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial,' published in Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, reported that patients in the active group had significantly less pain in the post-anaesthesia care unit and at eight hours postoperatively. Significantly fewer participants in the active group used narcotics in the post-anaesthesia care unit and at eight hours postoperatively. Average pain scores were excellent for both groups and there was no difference in the number of medication-related side effects between the two groups.

“Pre-emptive analgesia before outpatient ARS decreases early postoperative pain, reduces the number of patients who require narcotics in the early postoperative period, and does not increase medication-related side effects,” the authors conclude. “Administration of pre-emptive analgesia, including acetaminophen, gabapentin, ketamine and dexamethasone, is safe and effective, and it should be implemented for appropriate patients undergoing ARS.”

To access this paper, please click here

Add new comment

Restricted HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a href hreflang> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote cite> <code> <ul type> <ol start type> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <h2 id> <h3 id> <h4 id> <h5 id> <h6 id>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and email addresses turn into links automatically.