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CDC report - CRC screening lowest in adults aged 50 to 54

Mon, 03/16/2020 - 16:08
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The prevalence of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is lowest among adults aged 50 to 54 years, according to research, ‘Vital Signs: Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Use - United States, 2018’,  published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Dr Djenaba A Joseph from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues analysed data from the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to estimate the percentages of adults aged 50 to 75 years who reported CRC screening consistent with the recommendations of the US Preventive Services Task Force.

They found that 68.8 percent of adults were up to date with CRC screening in 2018. Among respondents aged 65 to 75 years and 50 to 64 years, the percentage up to date was 79.2 and 63.3 percent, respectively. Among persons aged 50 to 54 years, CRC screening prevalence was lowest at 50.0 percent and increased with age.

For respondents aged 50 to 64 years, the prevalence of CRC screening was lowest and highest, respectively, for those without health insurance (32.6 percent) and for those with a reported annual household income of ≥$75,000 (70.8 percent). Among respondents aged 65 to 75 years, CRC screening prevalence was lowest and highest, respectively, for those without a regular health care provider (45.6 percent) and for those with a reported annual household income of ≥$75,000 (87.1 percent).

Among states, CRC screening prevalence was highest in Massachusetts (76.5%) and lowest in Wyoming (57.8%).

"Specific population-based efforts to increase CRC screening are needed so that screening might start at age 50 years and continue as recommended through age 75 years for maximum benefit,” the authors wrote. “CRC screening prevalence is lower among adults aged 50–64 years, although most reported having a health care provider and health insurance. Concerted efforts are needed to inform persons aged <50 years about the benefit of screening so that screening can start at age 50 years.”

To access this paper, please click here